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Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016
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Commentary: Time for the Hard Part

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016

By: Neil Markee
Editor in Chief-Purchasing Link

After the Paris climate talks concluded, an editorial in the December 15, 2015 issue of the New York Times noted, “The Hard Part Comes Now.” Another, on February 10, 2016, titled “Justices Deal Blow to Obama Effort on Emissions,” confirmed the pessimistic prediction.  One of the goals of the conference had been to develop agreement on the how to reduce atmospheric carbon through a global reduction in the use of fossil fuels, most notably coal. On December 12, 2015 the Wall Street Journal had published, “King Coal Hard to Dethrone.” The article noted the Philippines would open 23 new coal power plants over the next five years to meet demand. The added capacity is expected to double the amount of CO2 produced to 70 million metric tons a year by 2035. Similarly, Vietnam plans to double its coal plants to 40 by 2020. And China added an extraordinary 39 gigawatts in new coal-fired capacity last year, enough to power millions of homes.” And, “Japan is building dozens of new coal plants in the wake of the Fukushima disaster.” At least in Asia, it seems coal isn’t about to be dethroned anytime soon, despite the Paris agreement and national commitments. The Asian nations involved probably see this as a contest between living standards and carbon emissions and have adopted to address living standards first. Even European nations such as Poland, where 90% of the electrical power is generated by coal burning plants, will find it all but impossible to shift quickly to another source of energy. “The commodity is cheap and supplies about 40% of the world’s energy according to the International energy agency. “

Nations are not likely to sacrifice their own living-standards to achieve atmospheric carbon-reduction while other nations that are not dedicated to any reduction are offsetting that savings–at least, not unless the committed believe a crisis is at hand, and most do not. According to the December article in the WSJ, developed nations are willing to offer substantial financial and technical aid to assist developing nations to switch to cleaner sources of power. The U.S. share would be at last $860 million annually by 2020. I think it is fair to say that many potential recipient nations will see the billions promised as not nearly enough to enable them to approach the living standards of their developed brothers while shifting away from cheap coal. However, I suspect the developed nations will try to insist on some appropriate contribution from all nations, because few would be willing to ask for sacrifice at home only to see their hard-earned carbon reductions offset by increases in the undeveloped world by nations receiving aid.

 More than likely, not many in the developed world will see this as an outstanding opportunity to achieve massive wealth-redistribution. Successful nations believe that they have earned their living standards and have made major contributions in many other areas such as public health, science, medicine, technology, engineering and governance to at least in part offset their past carbon production. I don’t believe feelings of national guilt will prove to be a sufficient motivational factor long-term. For many, national security and improving living standards remain the top priorities. Recently, President’s Obama administration sought to use the regulatory process through the EPA to substantially change how electrical power is generated in the U.S. The process would save time by avoiding the need for congressional hearings and approval.  In what has been described as unprecedented action, the Supreme Court intervened. “In a major setback for President Obama’s climate change agenda, the Supreme court on Tuesday temporarily blocked the administration’s effort to combat global warming by simply regulating emissions from coal fired power plants.” According to the February 10, 2016 article in the NYT, Solicitor General Donald B. Verrilli Jr. urged the Supreme Court to reject the request for a stay while the case moves forward. He noted, “Climate change is the most significant environmental challenge of our day, and is already affecting national health, welfare and the environment.” I suspect the Supreme Court recognized the importance of the issues involved, and the implications of the action desired by the government and decided that they wanted to slow the process to allow time to more carefully consider the consequences and alternatives. They may have thought that this was too important to be addressed by a simple change in EPA regulations not requiring the consideration and concurrence of congress. In any case, the Court will take a more detailed look at the government’s desired action and perhaps the process in the future. Personally, I don’t believe a simple, quick, regulatory change would produce the needed public buy-in required for the long-term success of the continuing action required to deal with climate change. 

 Where does that leave us? I think about where we were. Here in the U.S., the focus is on the presidential nominating-process. And the signatories of the Paris pact all seem to be waiting to see what the other nations are prepared to actually do in terms of the environment before committing their own nation to anything major. The nominating process will eventually come to an end and we’ll have an election. Diplomatic back-channel communications will allow nations to better understand their peers’ plans and develop their own.  Until those are accomplished, I doubt congress will do much about climate change. On the international scene, the ongoing discussion seems to suggest change will be deliberate and incremental over an extended period. Nothing as sweeping as some propose is likely to take place over night. From what I read in the media, we have taken since roughly 1850 to get us where we find ourselves and more than likely we’ll need more than a few decades to notice any substantial turn around.

 What has all this got to do with purchasing in support of higher education? What’s the point? Patience and persistence may be the most important characteristics of people seriously working toward a solution on campus and off. Despite pickets, demands and protests, this is going to take generations to resolve, partly because of the scope of the problem and the global political considerations. Several future generations of undergraduates and faculty will still be contending with these problems. A permanent solution will require lifestyle changes and, in that area, deciding who should change what is a political issue not subject to scientific problem-solving. The world’s reliance on coal, oil and gas will not be ended short-term. For example, there is no replacement on the horizon for the 40% cheap coal contributes to satisfying global power demand except more oil and gas–and neither meet the zero carbon-contribution and renewable energy tests. I think it could be decades before we see a significant decline in the rate of increase in atmospheric carbon. Clearly, a few scientific and engineering breakthroughs would help.

People like to think they are contributing, doing their share to solve problems. Are we doing our share on campus? If we are going to preach the need for carbon reduction, we’ll be more effective if we set a good example. When town folks see a climate-change demonstration underway locally, they might reasonably wonder how does a campus of, say, 10,000 students compare in overall electrical power consumption and carbon generation with a town of the same size? On campuses, it’s easy to believe the ever-increasing demand for more electrical power related to the proliferation of useful gadgets is justified. If you wonder about how many megawatts the super bowl consumed,  have you considered the combined power consumption of a season of night basketball and football games or rock concerts on campuses across the nation? Here in Florida, just about all team sporting activity at all levels takes place at night, to avoid the heat of the day. Every night, you can see brightly lighted football, soccer lacrosse, field hockey and whatever fields on the horizon. We see that as a worthwhile investment in our children. What is the carbon contribution of a weekend away skiing? If we have a story to tell, are we letting the public know what we are doing to reduce atmospheric carbon other than protesting?

What’s happening on your campus?

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From the President: Negotiation - Does It Sound Daunting? Instead, Consider How You Build Relationships

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016

Lisa Deal, C. P. M.
University of Florida
NAEP President 2015-2016

One of the subject areas about which NAEP membership routinely requests training is negotiation.  Our customers also often want assistance from us/Procurement regarding negotiation.  I think we all want help learning to negotiate because the word “negotiation” can have an implication of a tough, intensive, combative session where one side wins and another loses.  I don’t find that kind of situation something I look forward to experiencing (although I understand some people do) and our customers – and most often suppliers, don’t either.  What I’ve learned by attending NAEP sessions about negotiation, reading about the subject, and actually participating in or leading negotiations, is that it’s really all about knowing what you need, understanding what’s important to the other person/side and building a relationship to talk about it.   That doesn’t sound nearly at unpleasant as someone winning and losing to me.

 Listening is the foundation of building a relationship.  Sure, in negotiation you have to know what you want, but listening is how you will learn what is important to the person or organization with whom you negotiating.  Remember that we don’t only negotiate with suppliers, we all negotiate in our lives daily – do you have a family? Co-workers? You negotiate in those relationships all the time.  The more you listen, the easier it is to tell how important things are to the other person, and whether it is more important to you, or to them.  Listening is the key to building relationships with colleagues, customers and suppliers.  To learn more about negotiation, register for the Annual Meeting, May 22-25 in San Antonio, TX.  Early bird rates expire April 22. I hope to see you there, and look forward to meeting and listening to you.

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Purchasing Link Redesign - Same Name, New Experience

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016


You may have noticed something a little different with this edition of the Purchasing Link newsletter: we’ve been hard at work adding more than a fresh coat of paint to the Purchasing Link!
 
The redesigned email announcement you just received is mobile-friendly so you can take Purchasing Link on the go with you. The email now makes it easier to quickly find what you are looking for. Click on the Purchasing Link header and you’ll land at the top of this website page or you can click directly on the article you’d like to read.

The Purchasing Link still resides on the NAEP website but it is now in an easier to read format. Most importantly, current NAEP members can now comment on articles of interest. Sign in with your NAEP member profile to comment and respond to the articles each month.

Want to be notified of comments and updates to any of the articles in this newsletter? Click on the "subscribe" button up top. Please note that this button does not subscribe or unsubscribe you to the Purchasing List distribution list. Should you ever wish to unsubscribe from the email notification, simply do so by following the prompt at the bottom of the email you receive or notify us.

Enjoy the new Purchasing Link! If you have comments or suggestions on how to improve the newsletter, please email us or leave them in the comments section of this article. If you would like to write for the newsletter either on a regular basis or submit an article periodically or even just once, let us know.

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2016 NAEP Annual Meeting Tips

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016

Register By April 22 for the Early-Bird Discount

Register for the conference by April 22, 2016, to receive the early-bird discounted registration rate. Full conference registration includes the Host Event on Sunday evening, all keynote sessions and educational workshops, Exhibit Hall access, continental breakfast Monday through Wednesday, lunch on Tuesday, and the Awards Luncheon on Wednesday. 

Hotel Information:
San Antonio Grand Hyatt
600 East Market Street
San Antonio, TX 78205
Rooms are available at the NAEP discounted rate of $189 single/double plus applicable taxes.
Phone: 210.224.1234
Online reservations: https://resweb.passkey.com/go/NAEP2016

Arrive in Time for These Pre-Program Special Events:
  • Leadership Forum: Use of Self: Strengthening Your Emotional Intelligence
    Sunday, May 22 ~ 12:00 p.m.- 4:30 p.m. Additional event, registration fee required. This year, the featured topic is Emotional Intelligence (EI). What is your EI and how can it help you? Register for this popular Sunday event to find out.
  • New Attendee Orientation
    Sunday, May 22 ~ 4:45 p.m.-6:00 p.m. First time at the Annual Meeting? Plan to attend this introductory session to learn the lay of the land and meet others navigating the meeting for the first time as well.
  • Host Event at the Lonesome Dove
    Sunday, May 22 ~ 7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. Start your conference experience with a bang at the Lonesome Dove host event next to the hotel. Enjoy heavy appetizers along the riverwalk. There will be a few special surprises at this event so plan to attend!
  • Fun Run/Walk
    Tuesday, May 24 ~ 7:00 a.m.-8:30 a.m. Register from 6:15 a.m.-6:30 a.m.
    Bring your running gear and garb for an exhilarating run or walk, at your own pace. Arrive back in time for the continental breakfast at 8:30 a.m.

View the Conference Program:

To see the complete conference program, including all keynote speakers, top-notch educational sessions and special events, click here.

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Changing Our Business Culture, One Institute at a Time

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016

By Ernest Webster,
Business Development Coordinator, University of Georgia
Co-Founder of the NAEP Supplier Diversity Institute

“We’ve come a long way Baby” is a familiar slogan used by minority, female and same-gender groups from the 1960s to show how providing equality and opportunity continues to improve the overall quality of life for everyone in the United States. And while we still have a long way to go, great strides have been made in the business world, housing, the arts and acceptance of lifestyles.

In 2004, NAEP committed itself to improving a portion of the business aspect by creating its own Supplier Diversity Institute so that its Membership can better serve the minority and women’s business community by providing more contracting opportunities.
“Educate, Empower and Sustain” is the theme for the 2016 NAEP Supplier Diversity Institute that will be held July 31 through August 2 in Kansas City, Missouri. This institute strives not only to educate supplier diversity professionals, it will also show them how to maintain best business practices and sustain Supplier Diversity programs for their respective universities and colleges.

When I started in this field as an EOC officer with city government in 1984, Supplier Diversity was known as Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action for “protected classes.” Government agencies and institutions, along with the larger corporations, jumped on the bandwagon, as they attempted to make up for past injustices done to specific groups. “Set-Aside” programs and other race- and gender-related programs were created, only to be dismantled several years later by the courts as being too one-sided.
Private nonprofit agencies, such as the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC) and others, began to address the challenges faced by diverse suppliers, with government and universities and colleges following suit by creating their own diverse business-assistance programs.

By the time I began duties at the University of Arizona in 2001 as a Supplier Diversity Manager/Small Business Utilization Manager, the country realized that in order for true equality to work in the business community, everyone had to contribute and work towards a common goal.

Supplier Diversity programs were modified to explain the importance of providing more opportunities to diverse businesses; assisting diverse businesses; and maintaining a continuing window of contract opportunity.

The 2016 Supplier Institute will give you a chance to share successes and challenges, as well as a chance to learn and a chance to create new successes for your programs. I’m going to attend and I look forward to seeing you all again.

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NAEP Supplier Diversity Institute: Discount for More Than Three Registrations

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016

When your institution purchases three (3) Full Registrations, it is eligible for a $100 discount on all subsequent registrations.

Regardless of your staff’s experience within supplier diversity or the maturity of your diversity program, there will be a session for every level of procurement professional. New this year will be exhibit tables where attendees will have the opportunity to meet with supplier diversity vendors from across the country.

When: July 31- August 2, 2016

Where: Embassy Suites Kansas City –Plaza
220 West 43 St.
Kansas City, Missouri 64111

Reservations: 816.756.1720. Use the Group Code: "NEP." The NAEP discounted room rate is $135.

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Awards and Scholarship Nominations: March 15 Deadline

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016

There is still time to submit nominations for the 2015 National Awards and for the three NAEP Scholarships. March 15 is the deadline for filing your nominations for these honors. The awards are in recognition of contributions made to NAEP and to the procurement profession as a whole. Winners will be announced at NAEP’s 95th Annual Meeting, May 22-25, 2016 in San Antonio, Texas.
The following national awards are currently available:

  • Bert C. Ahrens Achievement Award
    Recognizes outstanding contributions to NAEP over the lifetime of a procurement career. This is the highest form of recognition by NAEP.
  • Distinguished Service Award
    Recognizes extraordinary service to an institution, the higher education community, NAEP, or to the purchasing profession at a regional or national level.
  • Neil D. Markee Communicator of the Year
    Recognizes outstanding contribution to the profession during the year through the written or spoken word.
  • Bob Ashby Mentor of the Year
    Recognizes outstanding service as a mentor to a member of NAEP.
  • Young Professional in Procurement Award
    Recognizes the efforts and contributions to procurement from an outstanding young professional who has fewer than 10 years of experience OR under 40 years old.
  • Volunteer of the Year Award
    Acknowledges and recognizes the voluntary achievements of a member who has contributed time and resources to benefit the overall goals of the association
  • NAEP Award of Excellence in Procurement
    Awarded to an institution on the basis of the procurement department's contribution to, and support of, the mission of their institution.

Have a question about these awards? Contact NAEP or Awards Committee Program Chair Denise Finn, University of Kentucky. Nominations close on March 15, 2016.

SCHOLARSHIPS

NAEP offers continuing education scholarships for deserving procurement professionals and their dependents to further their education. Apply by March 15th for one of these two scholarships.

Each year NAEP offers scholarship money for you to continue your professional development with NAEP coursework. In 2016, scholarships are available in the following regions: Great Lakes, Great Plains, Michigan, Northwest, Pacific, Rocky Mountain, and TOAL.

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RFP & Job Description Contests Extended

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016

Our volunteer Professional Development committee is pleased to announce that you have a few more weeks to help us grow our shared resources. Take a few minutes this month to add your unique RFP and your job descriptions to our reference libraries.

RFPs
Why reinvent the wheel? You can potentially save significant staff time by reviewing the RFP library to see if another similar institution has gone through the same process as you. Learn from what your colleagues have already done.

Job Descriptions
Benchmark your staff job duties and responsibilities against what other similar institutions are doing. Share your job descriptions of your department so others can learn from you. Don’t want to share the specifics of your school or department? That’s okay. Remove the identifying information and indicate if the description of the position is for a small or large school and/or a public or private school.

Why Contribute?
In addition to helping us build on our shared knowledge, you also have the opportunity to win a complimentary registration for the 2017 Annual Meeting. This year, we are holding two separate contests - one for new RFPs and one for new Job Descriptions. Compete against other institutions similar in size (number of Full Time Equivalent Students): Small (100 - 5,000), Medium (5,001 - 10,000) and Large (10,001+). With each unique entry, a ticket will be placed in a drawing held during the 2016 Annual Meeting. For both the Job Description Challenge and the RFP Challenge, a winner from each category will receive a complimentary registration for the 2017 Annual Meeting

Need to Know:
The extended deadline date is now March 25, 2016. Review the document libraries on this site to see how you can supplement our knowledge base – duplicate RFPs will not count.

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Sustainability on Campus

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016

Michigan State Applies Organic-Based Liquid to Combat Ice and Snow
In contrast to traditional salting methods alone, Michigan State University uses an organic-based liquid deicer to melt ice and snow on campus. Derived from beet juice, this substance cuts down on harmful chlorides that would eventually make their way to a nearby river. The organic deicer is more effective under colder weather conditions than traditional salt because it melts the snow and ice at lower temperatures.

Harvard Chooses to Be a Chemical Flame-Retardant-Free Campus
In November 2015, Harvard became the first university in the nation to sign a pledge stating their preference for purchasing furniture that is manufactured without the use of toxic chemical flame retardants. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency there are more than 80,000 chemicals in use today. Most are unregulated and only some have undergone sufficient health testing.

$41M in Cost Avoidance Anticipated for Urbana College of Engineering through Energy Conservation
A set of energy conservation projects on the Urbana campus is expected to result in  $41M in cost avoidance over the next 20 years and reduce the campus deferred maintenance backlog by an estimated $25M. Projects will include the installation of new HVAC equipment, direct digital controls, fume hoods, heat recovery systems, and occupancy sensors. Substantial completion is expected by July 2018.

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Upcoming Webinars

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016

Addressing Chemicals of Concern: Furniture Purchasing Can Lead to Creating a Healthier Environment: March 31, 2016

Well documented scientific research has clearly shown that the chemical flame retardants, widely used in upholstered furniture, are harmful to public health and provide no fire safety benefit. Due to a change in regulations and a shifting market, higher education institutions can now take concrete steps toward reducing risk and promoting a safe and healthy indoor environment by purchasing furniture that meet the necessary fire safety codes without harmful chemicals.
This presentation will inform you about the chemicals and materials of concern used in furniture, the latest information on the new flammability regulations, ways to reduce exposure to these toxic chemicals. The Center for Environmental Health will review many of the eco-labels and provide concrete purchasing tips.
 
In addition, Harvard University will provide a case study with general guidelines for how to easily procure flame retardant free furniture in a cost-neutral or even cost-saving manner.
Click here to register for this free webinar and to see the full calendar of webinars

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Web Channel: Managing Your Profile

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016

by: Mark Polakow
NAEP Technology Manager

Welcome to the Web Channel where I, your friendly neighborhood NAEP Webmaster, will focus on how you, our members, can best make use of NAEP's website and technology. In this issue we will look at your NAEP Member Profile. Also, please visit NAEP's tutorial section for video tutorials on many common and administrative tasks.

Your NAEP Profile is more than just your contact info and is a handy tool for many tasks including exploring and sharing new content, making connections with other procurement professionals, maintaining an active procurement resume, and managing invoices and registrations. To manage and explore your profile, first log in to the NAEP website. When you initially log in, you are brought to your profile home – this is a great place to upload or add your photo so others know who you are and will recognize you at the annual meeting!

If you haven’t uploaded a photo yet, just mouse-over the institution image and click the upload icon to choose a photo from your computer and add it to your profile:

The “Manage Profile” link under the My Profile menu on the right side of the page allows you easy access to all of your profile functions:

Information & Settings:

  • If your personal information changes, you can update it in the “Edit Bio” section.
  • Preferences” allows you to control when email notifications are sent to you.

Invoicing, Payments & History

  • “Invoices” shows you a detailed list of purchases from the NAEP store, and allows your organization’s Member of Record a simple spot to pay dues.
  • Event Registrations” allows you to see a list of events you have attended, print receipts, and even modify the registration details of upcoming events. The pen & paper icon next to an event means you can click it to modify details of that event or even add another attendee.

The Content & Features section allows you to maintain a Photo Gallery replete with album management, and also gives you a Files and Links library to store important documents or noteworthy sites. The content for both of these features are uploaded from your computer and can be shared OR NOT with other members at your discretion!

Tune in next month when I delve into making use of the “Community” section of your profile, and look at some best practices for messaging and forum posting!


Suggestion Box: If you have a topic you would like me to address in the Web Channel, or have a question or comment, please feel free to contact me any time.

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Quote of the Month

Posted By NAEP, Friday, March 4, 2016
Updated: Friday, March 4, 2016

“People don't resist change. They resist being changed.”

Peter Senge

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